Ranching

Oral History Interview: Thelma Genevieve Parish

Thelma Genevieve Parish, a.k.a. Sister Parish, was born in 1918. She descended from prominent families in the history of Hawai‘i, and shared generational ties to the ‘ili of Pu‘uloa in Honouliuli Ahupua‘a. She was educated as an anthropologist, and became a Catholic nun serving for 50 years as a teacher and school administrator with the Order of Sacred Hearts. Sister Parish was a lifelong student of history and until her passing in 2004, she was working on a manuscript of Hawaiian history. Unfortunately her work has been left incomplete.

Oral History Interview: Harry Alama

Harry Alama was born in 1958, and began coming to ‘Ewa Beach with his family in the mid-1960s. Harry’s family secured leases on three lots from the Dowsett-Parish family and built homes along the ‘Ewa Beach coast in the late 1930s, early 1940s. When the war broke out they were unable to return to the shore, but after the war, they settled back in. In the early 1960s, development was coming to ‘Ewa Beach and the family decided to give up some of the leases—those are the lands that were later associated with Ted Farm and family.

Oral History Interview: Mark Kahalekulu

Mark ‘Ehukai Kwock Sun Yoshio Kahalekulu was born in 1956 along the Honouliuli coast, at ‘Ewa Beach. His kupuna father worked for the Dowsett-Parish Ranch on the Pu‘uloa lands, and lived at various locations between Pu‘uloa, One‘ula, and Kualaka‘i. The Kahalekulu line originated in the Ho‘okena-Ho‘opūloa Region of South Kona, and were displaced by the 1926 Mauna Loa eruption. Mark’s entire young life from toddler through high school was connected to the ocean and nearshore lands of the Honouliuli  Ahupua‘a.

Digging for Water in Honouliuli

In this article, entitled “Seeking Water Resources at Honouliuli and on Lanai” and subtitled “Trust in the rod of diviner is unabated” and “Converts of Rev. Mr. Mason are still digging for water on island of Lanai,” an individual referred to as Mr. Mason of New Zealand is consulted to find areas to dig for water in Honouliuli. Mason uses a divining rod to find the underground water.

Honouliuli Ranch Water Development

Developing reservoirs capable of supporting the agriculture foreseen for Honouliuli was integral to the success of the land colonization scheme. The article below, entitled “A very large reservoir to be constructed to hold a million and a half gallons of water,” is about the Honouliuli Ranch water development. A reservoir with 1.5 million gallon capacity was planned.

Great Land Colonization Scheme

The Great Land Colonization Scheme was headed by Benjamin F. Dillingham for lands at Kahuku, Waimea, Kawailoa, and Honouliuli. He formed a joint stock company called the Hawaiian Colonization Land and Trust Company. The company would purchase the lands, and divide and develop them for convenient purchase or lease [8:151–152]. The businessmen associated with the scheme are as follows:

Pages